Production of another COVID-19 vaccine could begin in weeks

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Sanofi's logo appears on a wall of its headquarters building. Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline have launched a large clinical trial of their COVID-19 vaccine that will enroll 35,000 adult volunteers in the United States, Asia, Africa and Latin America.(Thibault Camus / Associated Press) Share Close extra sharing options

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PARIS —

Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline said Thursday that they have launched a large clinical trial of their COVID-19 vaccine that will enroll 35,000 adult volunteers in the United States, Asia, Africa and Latin America, and production of the vaccine could begin within weeks.

The study will test vaccine candidate formulas against the original coronavirus strain that spread from Wuhan, China, and against the variant first seen in South Africa, the pharmaceutical firms said.

If the trial is successful, regulators could approve the vaccine for use in the last three months of the year, the drugmakers said in a statement.

“Manufacturing will begin in the coming weeks to enable rapid access to the vaccine, should it be approved,” they said.

World & Nation

Sanofi and GSK say their COVID-19 vaccine strongly protects adults in early trials

World & Nation

Sanofi and GSK say their COVID-19 vaccine strongly protects adults in early trials

Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline say that their potential COVID-19 vaccine triggered strong immune responses in all adult age groups during trials.

Their statement quoted Thomas Triomphe, who leads vaccine research and development at Sanofi Pasteur, as saying: “We are encouraged to see first vaccinations starting to take place in such an important, pivotal Phase 3 study.”

Earlier this month, the firms said their vaccine candidate triggered strong immune responses in all adult age groups in preliminary trials after an earlier setback, boosting optimism the shot may join the fight against the pandemic this year.

After two doses of the vaccine candidate, participants showed antibodies in line with those found in people who had recovered from the disease, according to results of the previous, smaller trial.

Regulators have already authorized a number of COVID-19 vaccines, though experts say more are needed as public health authorities around the world race to vaccinate their residents amid a pandemic that has already killed more than 3.4 million people and caused economic havoc.

You got vaccinated — great! Now what?

Once you reach full immunity, your risk of getting a moderate to severe case of COVID-19 is greatly reduced, and you’ll want to go places and see people. Here are some guidelines and resources.

Now that I'm vaccinated … UPDATED April 28, 2021 | 11:42 AM Do I still have to wear a mask?

Only in public or around unvaccinated people, according to the CDC. If you’re around other fully vaccinated people in a private setting, go ahead and take your masks off. The CDC has relaxed its guidance for wearing masks outdoors.

Can I visit unvaccinated people?

Yes, you can visit one other household with unvaccinated people, indoors and without masks even, as long as they and anyone they live with are at low risk of developing a severe case of COVID-19. Avoid mixing with more than one household at a time.

Can I travel?

Be sure to check and follow the rules in place for wherever you’re headed, but in general, yes. And you don’t have to quarantine when you return home.

Can I attend large gatherings?

The CDC recommends that you do not. In California, stadiums and other large venues that are opening are doing so with limited capacity and physical distancing and other measures in place.

Suggested reading for the vaccinated:

    Did you lose your vaccine card? Did you post it on Instagram? Did you laminate it? Not to worry.Test your knowledge of post-vaccine dos and don’ts.Here are a whole bunch of things you can do in Southern California.

For those who aren’t yet:

    It’s really easy to get a shot now.If you know someone who is vaccine-hesitant, these video conversations might be useful.Need more information? Here’s the CDC website. And The Times’ complete vaccine coverage.

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